Personal Empowerment

posted in: Psychology | 0

Personal empowerment (or power) refers to the ability to control your own destiny. An intriguing aspect of personal empowerment is that how much we actually achieve is almost always a fraction of our potential.

What is Personal Empowerment?

Personal empowerment is an attitude or state of mind as much as anything else. You can retain a high level of personal empowerment even if other aspects of self determination are take away.

Empowerment personified - Nelson Mandela.
Personal empowerment personified: Nelson Mandela.

Nelson Mandela remained self empowered during his many years of captivity, emerging ready to shape his country’s future.

Personal empowerment is based on competence, vision, positive personal qualities, and service. When externalized it is likely to be more generous, creative and humane than other forms of power.

Personal empowerment is built by personal development. It comes from developing strength, confidence, and competence. It is self-assertion and a natural, healthy striving for love, satisfaction and meaning in one’s interpersonal world.

This type of power represents a movement toward self-realization and transcendent goals in life. Its primary aim is mastery of self, not others.

Commitment to Action

Personally empowered people get things done when they want to. If they establish a worthwhile goal and commit to it, they are able to take action and follow through until it is achieved.

The ability to commit to action is a good test of personal empowerment. You have personal empowerment if you naturally accept responsibility for what is within your control.

Consider someone with an addiction problem, say smoking. If the smoker believes smoking is bad for them and, if they are personally empowered, they will stop. That is because smoking and other addictions are within one’s own control.

How many smokers would keep smoking if you told them that, with 100% certainty, they will contract lung cancer next time they light up? Very few, one would imagine. Not smoking is a choice a person can make at any time. Being empowered let’s you make that choice more easily.

Case Study: Student Empowerment

Student with the power of invisibility
An arts student with the power of invisibility.

Students are unlikely to learn personal empowerment from attending classes.

Student empowerment comes from personal growth and understanding that you have choices. Ironically, education systems encourage students to give up personal responsibility more than they encourage students to accept it.

Students generally do better by following the course syllabus and fitting in with the teacher’s style. It’s hard to do this while committing to personal development.

Getting high grades comes, to some degree, at the expense of pursuing your own intellectual interests. The “ideal student” does the prescribed tasks rather the most beneficial learning activities for his or her self.

But becoming empowered is vital for students who want to have successful careers (and personal lives). The great leaders and innovators are empowered. Graduates with a disempowered mindset are on a much longer and more difficult path to reaching their potential.

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